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20110301
20110331
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with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
is a highly developed country. it is as technologically sophisticated as us, and there's much concern in the u.s. that a similar accident can occur here. how do you respond to that concern? >> well, first, i would agree with you. the reactor in chernobyl was of a different design. it was-- it had point of instability. it had no containment vessel. but we are looking very carefully at what is naepg japan because, as you say, they're using more advanced designs. a number of reactors in the united states have similar designs, and we're going to look at what went wrong in terms of the double-barreled whammy this huge, hung earthquake and huge su, and look to our reactors again and learn as much as we can so we can, if needed, improve the safety. by "if needed" what i really mean is we're always increasing the safety of our reactors, and not only our reactors but the safety of all our industrial systems. >> mr. secretary, two days ago a number of us wrote to chairman upton, whitfield, and stearns, asking our committee here investigate and hold hearings about the safety and prepared understandness of
150 people dead. former u.s. president jimmy carter has visited age-old american contractor in cuba. he was imprisoned for illegally providing internet access to cuban citizens. mr. carter says the authorities have made clear they did not intend to release him. now to japan, where the woes of the fukushima nuclear plant continue unabated. today, the country's nuclear safety agency said it has discovered the highest levels of radiation to date in seawater near the vicinity. -- to the facility. they acknowledged for of the six reactors at the plant will need to be scrapped. the company's process checked into a hospital with high blood pressure and dizziness. -- the company's loss check into a hospital. >> from the strip -- from the stricken plant to the sea, radiation is leaking. they don't know how or where it's coming from, but the levels are extraordinary. the government insists that contamination will be deleted as it spreads. this man is not sure. he farms seaweed 120 miles south of the plant. he's trying to salvage his nets, wrecked by the tsunami. the problems for -- the proble
the libyan air force and no longer exists as a fighting force. the senior u.s. commander says that troops loyal to gaddafi are still violating a u.n. resolution 1973. misrata is besieged by government tanks and artillery. mike will reject reports. >> characteristically the finance -- define it, colonel gaddafi on the first night of bombing. he said that those attacking libya would end up in the dustbin of history. colonel gaddafi has pledged there would be no surrender, and this on another night with a burst of anti-aircraft fire. from the american secretary of state hillary clinton, a suggestion that efforts might be under way to look for an exit strategy. >> i am not aware that he personally has reached out, but i know people allegedly on his behalf up and reaching out. that is why i say this is a very dynamic situation. >> be diplomatic strategy has been to convince the libyan leader to take another course. these pictures provide more insight into the military reality confronting him and his forces. it shows as helicopters taking off for an operation at night with american ships involv
think the one message-- and it's not the u.s., it's anyone who could speak to the syrians-- is to say the threshold not to be crossed is the use of indiscriminate violence against peaceful protesters. that's the threshold. we can be very disappointed about the lack of reform and that's a judgment the syrian people are going to have to make but in terms of the use of force against peaceful protesters, that's when i speak about kinsy and that i think should be the message. >> i agree. >> simon: we conclude with a conversation charlie taped recently with linda wells, the editor in chief of "allure" magazine. >> to do the magazine in the last 20 years is better than if we picked any other time-- not that we could have-- if we pick any other time in the past 20 years. more has chked now in the past 20 years, in terms of products, attitudes, in terms of the visual name of our culture and in terms of the acceptance of beauty and in terms of all the controversy attached to it-- plastic surgery and doing too much and anorexia and aging. there are all these subjects that are really vital. so th
community to intervene to "stop the massacres." more now, from theodore kattouf. he served as u.s. ambassador to he served as u.s. ambassador to syria from 2001 to 2003, part of a 31-year career in the foreign service, most of it in the middle east. and ammar abdulhamid is a liberal democracy activist whose anti-regime activities led to his exile from syria in 2005. he now lives in the u.s. and writes the blog "syria revolution digest." welcome to both of you. the reports are, ammar is that this started with the arrest of some teenagers in the town, some anti-regime graffiti. it has clearly group. how has it group, what is involved now. >> what you have to realize is the seeds of this revolution has been planted years ago. what you are talking about syria with the arrest of the children, we are talking about the immediate cause. but people got an idea that the times were suitable for a revolution, finally, when of course tunisia was made and managed to topple their regime and egyptians and we saw immediately how the spark really, or the wave of protests took ever o the region. a l
condemned a group of u.s. soldiers charged in the murders of three afghan civilians. it marked the first time karzai publicly addressed the case since graphic photos of the troops posing with dead afghans were published in "der spiegel" and "rolling stone magazine." karzai said the soldiers took drugs and, "they killed our youth for entertainment. they killed our elders for entertainment." the first of the five soldiers to be court-martialed pleaded guilty to murder last week. he was sentenced to 24 years in prison. fighters who support the internationally recognized leader of ivory coast seized control of the capital city today. the opposition forces staged a dramatic advance on yamoussoukro from all sides this week, before capturing it tonight. the commercial capital abidjan is likely the next battleground. president laurent gbagbo has refused to step down, despite losing to allasane outtara last fall. the food and drug administration convened a panel today to examine whether food dyes cause hyperactivity in children. the agency has long rejected any clear link. but a new report said t
as fundamental to the security of the u.s., and he said he is ready to see it serve a greater role in world affairs. the latest headlines for you on "bbc world news." the multi-national force setting up the no-fly zone over libya -- army officers and tribal leaders have joined opposition protests and in yemen. the president though says he is staying in power. abnormally high levels of radioactive substances have been found in seawater near the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant in japan. the radiation is 127 times higher than the government standard. a thousand people have died in the quick and tsunami. our correspondent sent this report. -- at 1000 people have died in the quake and tsunami. >> when the sea has taken all they know, how do you comprehend it? every landmark obliterated. even finding where his home stood is not easy to this 12- year-old. this is the first time he has been back. but for the third house on history, there is just avoid. >> my desk was up there. my dad was over here. this is where my bookshelf was. >> this is his 10-year-old sister and all that she found -- her schoo
. bbc news, tripoli. >> the general in charge of u.s. africa demand, leading coalition operations in libya, and said he does not expect operations to continue much longer. >> i do not think it will go on for very long time. and we have an opportunity to execute the requirements of the u.n. security council resolution. the most important part of which is to protect civilians. it is important to note with the net to a large degree by stopping the regime's attacks on benghazi. there are other places where civilians remain threatened by the regime. we are doing our best each and every day and night to protect the civilians. >> you are watching "bbc world news." still to come on the program -- more worries in japan around the fukushima nuclear plant. one of the reactors could be damaged. the countries involved and the military coalition over libya have been financing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign -- finessing a deal to transfer political control of their campaign to nato. matthew price reports. >> slowly, but surely, it is being transferred to nato. command rem
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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